SAINT MARY OF THE CROSS

Mary MacKillop was an Australian Catholic nun of the 1800s and 1900s.

To Australians of all ages and backgrounds she is a heroine. They love her. But do they really understand her?

Saint Mary MacKillop -- she gave her life to teaching poor children and founded an order of teaching nuns.

Saint Mary MacKillop -- she loved children, she loved justice and she loved God.

Saint Mary MacKillop -- so relevant to today’s world. There is much we can learn from her.

Let’s be sure that it is from the REAL Mary MacKillop that we learn.

Meet the REAL Mary MacKillop. Get a MacKillop’s-eye view of our world. Keep visiting this blog.



11
Apr

RESPECTFUL LANGUAGE CENTRAL TO ENDING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: what about respect for marriage?

“Stop it at the Start” is a government program to curb domestic violence by eliminating disrespectful language.
Domestic violence causes 10 percent of deaths among young Australian women.
It’s urgent to stop using slogans like “boys will be boys” as excuses for men hitting women.
Women aren’t merely objects for men’s sexual gratification – or just cheap cooks.
But why not?
We need a compelling reason that young men can relate to.
There is one:
Women, like men, are God’s children — two sexes to work together with God in creating new life — in the context of families based on marriage.
That’s the reason.
Government programs will never mention it.
It’s up to the Church to proclaim Marriage as a Sacrament — part of the natural law, written into human nature and our universe.
The Church’s credibility isn’t what it should be?
No. But who else is there to promulgate this life-or-death truth?

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9
Apr

GOOD FRIDAY FOOTBALL: another brain-damaging, soul-destroying, dumbing-down distraction.

Something new in 2017 — AFL football on Good Friday, the holiest day of the Christian year.
It’s disappointing.
Because it’s another case of the Christian faith being desecrated?
Not just that — Christians can get used to that.
But for everybody it’s a worry that with so many dilemmas in today’s world — violence, poverty, sexual deviations, disintegrating families, freedom of speech threatened, sacredness-of-life issues etc….
Issues with an ethical/moral/spiritual basis – we never seem to find time to think about them properly.
We don’t help ourselves by frittering away with endless sporting extravaganzas all days traditionally set aside to reflect on fundamentals.
A missed opportunity.

7
Apr

RACIAL DISCRIMINATION ACT, SECTION 18C: still in force, so what do we do?

Australia’s Racial Discrimination Act, section 18C, is still the law of the land.
It’s still un-lawful to make anybody feel “offended”.
But principled people never intentionally offend others, do they?
And they never contravene laws — or do they?
A couple of finer points to consider:
1. Regarding offending: while not intending to offend, you can’t control the feelings of sensitive persons who claim offence — or prove your innocent intention to somebody determined not to believe you. They’ve got you over a barrel.
2. Regarding obeying the law: consider the famous occasion when Jesus Christ was asked whether his fellow-Jews should pay taxes to the Roman occupiers. He said, “Pay to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and give to God what is God’s.”
In the case of 18C, let’s usually comply with it — but sometimes, when a black-and-white moral issue is at stake, God trumps everybody else.

3
Apr

THE CURRENT STATE OF FREE SPEECH IN AUSTRALIA: what to expect more of?

A Christian organisation now has permission to keep its board members’ names private — on the grounds of “public safety”.
This follows homosexual activists pressuring employers (including IBM) into signing on as “gay rights” supporters — then condemning them for having professing Christian board members.
Sydney’s Catholic Archbishop, Anthony Fisher, criticised, commenting that, “It’s part of our culture that Australians of all faiths or no faith have the opportunity to contribute to full and open discussion on all issues….”
Not really
“Our culture” is changing.
Would you encourage your child to stand up in a Victorian school classroom and say that he/she considers promiscuity and anal sex to be wrong and should be discouraged?
The result would be verbal, if not physical, violence.
When Catholic children undergo the rite of Confirmation, the bishop traditionally gives them a smack on the side of the face.
It’s a reminder that a war is on — and Christians must expect treatment about as good as was handed out to Jesus Christ in his lifetime.
.

31
Mar

HOW TO LOSE YOUR JOB? try being a Christian in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Homosexual-lifestyle activists are picking off, one-by-one, people associated with the so-called Australian Christian Lobby.
The message is, “quit your connection with this religious group or lose your job”.
Notable victims have been a Mr Allaby and a Mr Chavura – an engineer and a university lecturer.
Jesus Christ did warn people that being his follower means “denying yourself” – going without certain things. (Matthew’s gospel, chapter 16)
Perhaps, in these days, going without your job.
Jesus himself, due to his commitment to God, had to go without the freedom to move his arms and legs when they nailed him to a cross.
We, too, would do well to willingly undergo suffering in God’s cause.
Not to go looking for it, but to accept it and offer it up to God — if and when it happens.

28
Mar

IS HELPING PEOPLE KILL THEMSELVES OK? killing free speech seems to be OK too.

by Arnold Jago in Death, Ethics, Politics, Suffering

Victoria’s Health Minister, Jill Hennessy, has released a discussion paper on “developing and implementing a legislative framework for voluntary assisted dying”.
We, the public, are allowed to submit feedback (closing date, April 10).
But only certain kinds of feedback.
Her department warns:
“Please note that feedback that expresses an opinion for or against assisted dying will not be considered by the panel.”
So, we’re not permitted to discuss whether it’s right to intentionally make patients dead — only how to intentionally make patients dead.
Aren’t there non-homicidal alternatives — good nursing, fine-tuning of drug dosages, one-to-one spiritual support in facing the lonely truth of the situation?
What a pity not to address them seriously.
Spiritual support comes at a cost.
Money and time costs aren’t the issue — millions of Australian adults can afford, on average, 4 hours a day looking at screens (television, internet etc.)
The issue is whether we care enough.
Are we willing to expend the necessary long-term effort required to provide that spiritual support?