‘Women’ Category Archives

19
Apr

“THE RED PILL”: looking at an old problem in a different way, and getting a mixed reception!

by Arnold Jago in Entertainment, Family, Media, Women

The film “The Red Pill” explores difficulties facing men regarding violence, custody issues etc.
People seeing it mostly say it’s unbiased.
Nevertheless, “feminist” activists are browbeating cinemas into not screening it.
The film-maker herself identifies as a feminist.
It’s vital not to trivialise this into a “women’s-rights-versus-men’s-rights” wrangle.
“Rights” are an invention of politicians and ruling class — suitable for composing pretty documents like the “UN Declaration of Human Rights”.
Concerning real issues, where you and I live, the language of “rights” doesn’t work.
For a better society, we must think in terms of “responsibilities”.
Like marriage – irrevocably taking responsibility for each other and for the children, if any.
No violence, not even verbal violence — the parties having vowed to live and act as one.
Children should learn this from their mother’s knee — and hopefully observe it in practice.

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17
Apr

“GIRLS NEED TO BE FREE”: do they? is it even possible? what about the rest of us?

by Arnold Jago in Common Sense, Family, God, Happiness, Media, Women

Steve Biddulph’s latest book is “Ten Things Girls Need Most: To Grow Up Strong and Free”.
Was “free” really the word he was looking for?
Evolution theory – the kind usually pushed in media and classroom – leaves no room for freedom. Aren’t we just biochemical robots?
Common sense and true religion say that we aren’t.
If God exists, he has given us the freedom to sin – and the freedom not to sin. You can’t have one without the other.
So, try expressing an opinion in certain unfashionable no-go areas. Have a go.
You may lose your job — even your head.
Such things have been reported on TV. There would be lots more if the media didn’t self-censor.
And we’re also told that if we express certain un-trendy ideas, certain people will be offended and will (perhaps) kill themselves.
A kind of dictatorship-by-suicide-threat?

11
Apr

RESPECTFUL LANGUAGE CENTRAL TO ENDING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: what about respect for marriage?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Education, Family, Lifestyle, Modern Church, Politics, Women

“Stop it at the Start” is a government program to curb domestic violence by eliminating disrespectful language.
Domestic violence causes 10 percent of deaths among young Australian women.
It’s urgent to stop using slogans like “boys will be boys” as excuses for men hitting women.
Women aren’t merely objects for men’s sexual gratification – or just cheap cooks.
But why not?
We need a compelling reason that young men can relate to.
There is one:
Women, like men, are God’s children — two sexes to work together with God in creating new life — in the context of families based on marriage.
That’s the reason.
Government programs will never mention it.
It’s up to the Church to proclaim Marriage as a Sacrament — part of the natural law, written into human nature and our universe.
The Church’s credibility isn’t what it should be?
No. But who else is there to promulgate this life-or-death truth?

8
Mar

LEFT WING “PROGRESSIVE” POLITICS: progressing towards what?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Celebrities, Common Sense, Education, Faith, Family, Lifestyle, Media, Women

1. Australia’s “progressive” media are making a celebrity of a woman who calls Islam a “feminist” religion.
Don’t they know that in the countries where Islam is practiced most, women are stoned for alleged infidelity?
Didn’t an official Islamic spokesperson recently tell Australia’s Sky News that sometimes it’s OK to beat one’s wife?
Islam needs to “progressively” convert its own traditionalist adherents away from violence-prone fundamentalism.
2. Some Australians consider themselves “progressive” when Sydney streets are filled with persons promoting anal sex as normal.
Many Australians let their youngsters go to “progressive” schools which groom them to condone (if not to practise) that kind of thing, and to vilify anybody discouraging it?
Perhaps Australia needs to “progressively” eradicate those ideas.
Perhaps the Australians loudest in their claims to be progressive are progressing down the wrong track.

28
Feb

CHILD CARE IS A MOTHER’S JOB: or should we replace mothers with “expert” mercenaries at child care centres?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Family, Lifestyle, Politics, Women

Many or most Australian women believe they should care for their own children as their main care-giver.
Probably 99 per cent-plus babies would agree.
Any government putting pressure on mothers to abandon that role is thus their enemy.
A government ideologically dedicated to squeezing parents out of the child’s life is able to use financial coercion such that a caring family can’t survive.
To offer funding, subsidies, benefits and allowances for children left in the care of strangers at a child-care centre — while withholding them from carer-parents — is unjust.
The government’s Social Services Legislation Amendment (Omnibus Savings and Child Care Reform) Bill 2017, about to be voted on by the Senate, will aggravate these problems.
It should be rejected.
Sadly, Australia’s major parties all seem to have the mentality of treating work-at-home carer-mothers as second-class citizens.
A good reason for families never to vote for those parties.

27
Feb

MUSLIMS IN AUSTRALIA: give and take needed as they settle in?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Common Sense, Faith, Family, Justice, Lifestyle, Women

An Australian judge has refused to allow a Muslim woman to wear the niqab while testifying in court.
Too harsh? I don’t think so.
A judge must form opinions concerning witnesses’ truthfulness or otherwise. Body language, including facial expression, is part of that.
If we’re worried about harshness, consider the senior Muslim last week advocating beating women as “step three” in a process of dealing with relationship issues — after counselling, buying chocolates etc.
Joumanah El Matrah, of the Australian Muslim Women’s Human Rights Centre has testified that there are “significant problems” in how Islam was interpreted…and that Muslim women would be “extremely disadvantaged” by any form of sharia court… and that Islamic orthodox interpretative frameworks allocate women “an inferior status to men” rendering them “vulnerable to violence and abuse”.
Personally, I must say I admire some aspects of Muslim’s commitment to prayer, belief in modesty etc….
But there always seems something wrong — Allah seems to come over as un-loving.
When described as “merciful” it seems not to be “mercy” in the usual sense of the word.