‘Politics’ Category Archives

7
Apr

RACIAL DISCRIMINATION ACT, SECTION 18C: still in force, so what do we do?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Common Sense, Ethics, God, Politics

Australia’s Racial Discrimination Act, section 18C, is still the law of the land.
It’s still un-lawful to make anybody feel “offended”.
But principled people never intentionally offend others, do they?
And they never contravene laws — or do they?
A couple of finer points to consider:
1. Regarding offending: while not intending to offend, you can’t control the feelings of sensitive persons who claim offence — or prove your innocent intention to somebody determined not to believe you. They’ve got you over a barrel.
2. Regarding obeying the law: consider the famous occasion when Jesus Christ was asked whether his fellow-Jews should pay taxes to the Roman occupiers. He said, “Pay to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and give to God what is God’s.”
In the case of 18C, let’s usually comply with it — but sometimes, when a black-and-white moral issue is at stake, God trumps everybody else.

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28
Mar

IS HELPING PEOPLE KILL THEMSELVES OK? killing free speech seems to be OK too.

by Arnold Jago in Death, Ethics, Politics, Suffering

Victoria’s Health Minister, Jill Hennessy, has released a discussion paper on “developing and implementing a legislative framework for voluntary assisted dying”.
We, the public, are allowed to submit feedback (closing date, April 10).
But only certain kinds of feedback.
Her department warns:
“Please note that feedback that expresses an opinion for or against assisted dying will not be considered by the panel.”
So, we’re not permitted to discuss whether it’s right to intentionally make patients dead — only how to intentionally make patients dead.
Aren’t there non-homicidal alternatives — good nursing, fine-tuning of drug dosages, one-to-one spiritual support in facing the lonely truth of the situation?
What a pity not to address them seriously.
Spiritual support comes at a cost.
Money and time costs aren’t the issue — millions of Australian adults can afford, on average, 4 hours a day looking at screens (television, internet etc.)
The issue is whether we care enough.
Are we willing to expend the necessary long-term effort required to provide that spiritual support?

24
Mar

CORY BERNARDI, POLITICIANS’ PAY AND COMMON SENSE: are our senators greedy, unintelligent (or both)?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Common Sense, Ethics, Happiness, Money, Politics

Last week, Australian Senators voted on a motion for senators to receive no pay increases until a budget surplus is achieved.
It was moved by independent (ex-Liberal) Senator Cory Bernardi.
Sad to say, only 6 of our 75 senators voted for it.
The Coalition, Labor and the Greens senators all voted against.
Anyone moving a motion that’s rejected by all three of the above-mentioned parties is probably doing something right.
Senator Bernardi is a conscience politician.
We’ll be hearing a lot more from him.
Hopefully his movement will continue to propose common-sense policies which level-headed people will happily support.

11
Mar

RACE RELATIONS LAW, SECTION 18C: striking the right balance….

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Common Sense, Multiculturalism, Persecution, Politics

In Australia it’s illegal to say, write or draw anything that offends anybody regarding their background.
We have bureaucrats paid to decide whether the offended-ness is justified — or if the expression of opinion was legitimate.
The bureaucratic decisions seem usually biased (towards the complainers).
Instead should we have panels of reasonable, typical, un-biased citizens — not bureaucrats — to decide?
Bondi tram passengers? Pub patrons?
But are not many pub-dwellers regular alcohol-drinkers? A possible worry, brain function-wise?
Tram-travellers could be a more reasonable cross-section.
Am I allowed to mention that people younger than 30 shouldn’t be eligible?
It’s well known that brain development is incomplete until at least one’s late twenties.
We could argue all day.
But it’s really not so complicated.
Best simply scrap Section 18C and deal with intimidation etc. under other already-existing legislation.

6
Mar

RIGHT WING POLITICS: here to stay or flash in the pan?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Family, God, Justice, Politics

Will the worldwide increase of support for right-wing politics continue?
Election results from Western Australia and the Netherlands should help work that out.
Many are sick of communism-like dictatorship-minorities imposing ideologies on families and their children.
Are we automatons/robots programmed and re-programmable by secular dogma?
Or is there a human free will – by means of which we make real decisions for which we can be held responsible?
It’s to the Judaeo-Christian God of the Bible that we must turn to find the loving father whose presence makes sense of the world — who seeks to redeem us, befriend us, adopt us and fulfil us as his children.
The homosexuality-promoting lobbyists are very counter-productive.
Their intolerance of objective comments about their lifestyle in the context of natural law gives them away.

28
Feb

CHILD CARE IS A MOTHER’S JOB: or should we replace mothers with “expert” mercenaries at child care centres?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Family, Lifestyle, Politics, Women

Many or most Australian women believe they should care for their own children as their main care-giver.
Probably 99 per cent-plus babies would agree.
Any government putting pressure on mothers to abandon that role is thus their enemy.
A government ideologically dedicated to squeezing parents out of the child’s life is able to use financial coercion such that a caring family can’t survive.
To offer funding, subsidies, benefits and allowances for children left in the care of strangers at a child-care centre — while withholding them from carer-parents — is unjust.
The government’s Social Services Legislation Amendment (Omnibus Savings and Child Care Reform) Bill 2017, about to be voted on by the Senate, will aggravate these problems.
It should be rejected.
Sadly, Australia’s major parties all seem to have the mentality of treating work-at-home carer-mothers as second-class citizens.
A good reason for families never to vote for those parties.