‘Modern Church’ Category Archives

12
Dec

TRUTH OR POST-TRUTH-POLITICS: is there a choice?

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Beauty, Celebrities, Media, Modern Church, Politics, Truth

“Post-truth politics” — are you sick of hearing that catchphrase?
The idea that by getting people booing and hooraying on demand, you can control their minds (while by-passing their brains).
What alternative is there?
Jesus Christ said:
“If you abide in my word, you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free…. Truly, I tell you, everyone who commits sin is a slave to sin.” (St John’s gospel, chapter 8)
Slave? Free?
Every weekend, 1.8 million Australians attend church.
If they listen properly and are taught gospel truth without fear or favour — might they stop being slaves to sin?
Could that be catching?
Australia perhaps becoming unrecognisable – free from lying, dishonesty and deceit?

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6
Dec

CHRISTMAS: why bother?

by Arnold Jago in Contemplation, Faith, Family, Forgiving, Happiness, History, Jesus, Lifestyle, Modern Church, Multiculturalism, Truth, Youth

Why celebrate Christmas?
Because we can’t help liking, honouring and admiring this unique person, Jesus Christ.
He was the ultimate one-off.
Above all, see how he totally refused to compromise.
When his challenging message was leading inevitably to his own painful death, he made his message even more challenging, more confronting.
There was no mistaking it:
“Love your enemies!”
Pray to God, saying:
“Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us!”
Yes, the Christian church is faulty — tragically unworthy of him who founded it….
Yet it’s in the church that we can hear his gospel read and preached.
In the church we can meet together with others who at least have a go at living Christ’s way.
Jesus Christ, born so long ago, can make you and me better.
He offers a motive for our children to grow into people who are better.
That’s why Christmas is important.
Have a good one.

27
Nov

THE CHURCH’S FOCUS FOR NEXT YEAR: the gospel according to Saint Matthew.

by Arnold Jago in Faith, Jesus, Modern Church

Today is the first Sunday of Advent — from the Church’s viewpoint it’s the first Sunday of a new year.
For the last 12 months, the gospel readings for Mass have mostly come from Saint Luke’s gospel.
Now, for 12 months, they’ll come mostly from Saint Matthew’s gospel.
Interestingly, Matthew is probably the gospel least compatible with the “discernment-type” belief-system of Pope Francis.
Matthew’s first 2 chapters describe Jesus’ family tree, his birth and the 3 wise men visiting.
Then comes John the Baptist, his predecessor-prophet, with the message: “Repent for the kingdom of God is at hand.”
Soon after that John is arrested – and that’s when Jesus starts his own public teaching ministry.
His theme? “Repent for the kingdom of God is at hand.”
Sounds familiar?
But there’s a difference.
Jesus makes it clear that his message is to be even tougher than previous prophets.
More demanding in at least 6 areas.
They are spelt out in Matthew’s gospel chapter 5 (from verses 21 to 48).

24
Nov

FORGIVENESS FOR ABORTION: the pope’s position gets a mixture of boos and hoorays.

by Arnold Jago in crime, Death, Family, Forgiving, Modern Church, Women

As from now the Pope says that all priests are able to give absolution (forgiveness) to persons involved in abortion.
Previously only certain priests had that authority.
He makes it clear that abortion was, is, and always will be, a grave sin.
But he’s trying to be a bit merciful in the way that grave sin is dealt with.
Anyway, let’s hope he wasn’t hoping to be thanked by the progressive types, including self-styled feminists.
For example, a lady journalist of the Sydney Morning Herald (22 November 2016) uses the headline “Women don’t need Pope Francis’ forgiveness for having abortions”.
But do they need God’s forgiveness?
That is the point.

21
Nov

POPE FRANCIS, CARDINAL BURKE & THE CHALLENGE TO FRANCIS’S ORTHODOXY: a progress (or lack of it) report

by Arnold Jago in Faith, Family, Lifestyle, Modern Church, Sacraments

Cardinal Raymond Burke and three other Cardinals have formally questioned the orthodoxy of Pope Francis’ March 2016 publication “Amoris Laetitia” concerning the “joy of love” in the context of Catholic marriage and family.
Their questions ask, in summary, whether Amoris Laetitia doesn’t contradict official Catholic teaching as per Pope John Paul II’s 1993 encyclical “Veritatis Splendor” — that “circumstances or intentions can never transform an act intrinsically evil by virtue of its object, into an act ‘subjectively’ good….”
Amoris Laetitia seems to say that people in adulterous relationships can receive Holy Communion.
The Pope hasn’t formally acknowledged or answered the questions.
He reportedly says the challenge is “not making me lose any sleep….”
“…sometimes criticisms are merely aimed at vindicating already fixed opinions. They are not honest; they are driven by a mean spirit to incite divisions.”
But is name-calling really good enough?

17
Nov

POPE FRANCIS UNDER FIRE: is he out of step with basic catholic teachings, including those of pope saint john paul II?

by Arnold Jago in Common Sense, Faith, Family, God, Modern Church

Four senior Cardinals have publicly expressed doubts about Pope Francis’ March 2016 publication entitled “Amoris Laetitia” which dealt with “the joy of love” in the context of Catholic teaching on marriage and family.
They’ve addressed him five questions which demand yes or no answers.
In summary, they propose that Pope Francis’ publication contravenes the formal teaching of Pope Saint John Paul II as spelt out in his 1993 encyclical “Veritatis Splendor”.
“Veritatis Splendor” says, for example, that “circumstances or intentions can never transform an act intrinsically evil by virtue of its object into an act ‘subjectively’ good….”
Which would mean that people involved in a sexually-active relationship with somebody not their husband/wife — thus sinning against the commandment “thou shalt not commit adultery” — should not receive Holy Communion until they’ve confessed the sin and stopped doing it.
And that parts of “Amoris Laetitia” where, for example, it talks about “circumstances which mitigate moral responsibility”, contradict both Pope Saint John Paul and the Ten Commandments.
So far, Pope Francis seems to have not responded to the questions.