‘Lifestyle’ Category Archives


CHILDCARE WORKERS WALK-OFF: and the notion of keeping one’s child at home.

by Arnold Jago in Family, Lifestyle, Women, Youth

People in the child-care industry are threatening to walk off the job if they don’t get more pay.
They are organising a “Keep Your Child at Home Day” to draw attention to their claims.
One claim is that low pay encourages high staff turnover — whereas children need continuity in order to bond with teachers.
If it’s helpful to have a one-off “keep child at home day”, may it do even more good to keep children at home every day?
Bonding with one’s mum seven days a week would give excellent continuity.
In today’s society, many people feel they can’t afford that.
Perhaps our society needs changing so that we can afford it?
First up, we need to ask ourselves do we really want to make the change?
If not, why not?

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JORDAN PETERSON: voice of common sense or naughty chauvinist?

by Arnold Jago in Common Sense, Lifestyle, Women

Jordan Peterson has been condemned for saying that ‘Women wearing high heels and make-up in the work-place are being sexually provocative’.
Yet everybody knows that what he says is true.
Nobody denies that men should also control their responses.
Let’s not argue about which sex is to blame….
Better to consider how both parties can together contribute to better relationships.



by Arnold Jago in Family, Lifestyle, Politics, Recent Developments

The other day, the island nation of Bermuda became the world’s first country to abolish same-sex marriage — one year after having legalised it.
Bermuda’s Governor, John Rankin, has now signed into law a bill reversing a 2017 Supreme Court ruling.
That ruling had been made despite a referendum in which Bermudian voters rejected same-sex marriage.
Bermuda has led the way — re-affirming that natural marriage is a one-man-one-woman union.
Same-sex marriage is neither inevitable nor irreversible.
Australia, for example, can reverse its current position any time.
Bermuda, population 60,000 is a cluster of 138 islands — 8 of them joined by bridges — in the North Atlantic Ocean 800km east of the United States.


FIXING AUSTRALIA: in three simple steps

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Common Sense, Family, Lifestyle, Women

What to do about older men falling for and/or exploiting young female associates?
Three obvious changes might be worth considering:
• Keep young females safe at home with family, learning how to be part of a family until they are ready to marry
• End consumption of alcohol by temptation-prone persons (i.e. everybody)
• Discontinue provocative dressing by young females
These suggested moves are only moderately trendy — but once we’re used to them everybody should be better off.


YOUNG HOPEFUL, YOUNG MUM, SURPRISED DAD: pray to God that all will turn out fairly happy.

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Celebrities, Common Sense, Family, Lifestyle, Politics

Australia’s most newsworthy unborn baby is having consequences in both private lives and in the political sphere.
Both good news and bad news.
The best news is that the child wasn’t aborted — a huge plus.
Dare we hope the mum will now decide to be a full-time mum?
Forget the job for a while.
Concentrate on feeding, cuddles etc.
Nobody is ever quite indispensable in the world of politics.
To this new citizen, his or her mum is absolutely indispensable.
Let’s wish this new mother all the best in the great responsibility and privilege that life has dropped in her lap.


HARM MINIMISATION, LIVE-IN REHABILITATION ETC. living with the drug/anti-drug mega-industry.

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Beauty, crime, Health, Lifestyle, Politics

One of Australia’s biggest industries is, unfortunately, the buying and selling of illegal drugs.
Another growth-industry is the harm-minimisation industry – which includes things like clean needle handouts, safe-injection rooms, methadone maintenance programs – and even live-in rehab centres.
These two industries need each other.
They flourish side by side.
When business is brisk, there will always be somebody willing to come up with a business model for live-in rehab — taxpayer-funded and profit-generating.
They’ll tell how their kind of rehab saves lives, prevents disease etc.
If you feel a bit skeptical about that, you may feel even more so after listening to the conclusions of British psychiatrist/drug researcher, Theodore Dalrymple:

He has written a book about it entitled “Romancing Opiates”.