‘History’ Category Archives

8
Dec

BOB KATTER MP: seems to be annoying the right people.

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Death, Ethics, Family, Health, History, Lifestyle

Bob Katter MP makes the point that “equality” for homosexually-active persons can be dangerous.
For example, giving them the “equal” right to donate blood has led, historically, to multiple deaths from AIDS in little children receiving their blood.
Mr. Katter’s mention of that fact has been described as a “homophobic rant”.
Many people were peeved that he should raise the subject.
However, the fact remains that those children are still dead.
Doesn’t giving homosexual couples the right to adopt children – now further entrenched by laws permitting them call their unions “marriage” — lead to harmful untruths being injected into the children’s brains?
Schools too, will be bullying children into undergoing gender-theory indoctrination which mocks and belittles the potentially beautiful institution of natural marriage.

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30
Jul

A HISTORY LESSON: religion, midlife crisises and violence

by Arnold Jago in Faith, History, Jesus, Persecution, Truth

In the year 622AD, the Prophet Muhammad, a 52-year old preacher of peace, was gaining very few converts among his community in Mecca.
Should he just go on preaching until he got too old — or until perhaps irate unbelieving enemies killed him?
No. He changed tactics, moving north to Medina – now as a warlord – raiding, enforcing conversions, killing men, women and children.
Tactics still in use today….
In the year 29AD, Jesus Christ, aged 30-odd, a moderately successful preacher in rural Galilee, took his disciples south to confront his opposition in Jerusalem.
No violence – still simply preaching God’s “kingdom” and condemning hypocrisy.
These methods soon led to his death on a cross.
Which of these two teachers was strong and which was weak?
Today’s professing Christians seem weak.
Not so much because they fight badly, but because they compromise with secularism and hypocrisy….
Which includes the use of violence in ways incompatible with the gospel of their Founder.

27
Jun

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS: uneasy relationship with the government: should it be more uneasy: or non-existent?

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Education, Ethics, History, Modern Church, Politics

Which Australian schools should get what funding?
The Catholic school system, arguably not getting e, has threatened to campaign politically against the government coalition parties.
All parties trot out the same words – that funding should be “needs-based”.
So what do students actually need?
For Catholics, education should, above all, teach the need to love God and our neighbours.
Funding isn’t the foremost need.
Government funding is, in fact, hazardous.
Saint Mary MacKillop, pioneer teacher of Australia’s Catholic poor in the 1800s, wrote:
“Australia is…a dangerous place for Catholics. The governments aim at strict secular schools and institutions for the children of the poor…the poor and their children (being) torn away from the true Faith.”
The Rule of her Order insisted that their schools “never receive aid in the way of fixed salaries from any Protestant government….”

nough

9
May

THE POPE VISITING FATIMA, PORTUGAL? but why? and so what??

by Arnold Jago in Celebrities, Faith, History, Modern Church, Mother of Jesus, Recent Developments, Sacraments

An 85-foot-tall glow-in-the-dark rosary — constructed by Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos outside Fatima’s Holy Trinity Basilica — glowing for the first time with the Pope reciting Rosary prayers for gathered pilgrims….
The Pope in Portugal — honouring the 100th anniversary of the first of several appearances of the Virgin Mary to three shepherd children at Fátima, Portugal, in 1917….
During 100 years since the apparitions, multiple conspiracy-theories springing up — particularly over the wording of the “Third Mystery” received by the children from an angel in July 1917….
NOT in dispute is that ‘pointing to the earth with his right hand, the angel cried out, “Penance, Penance, Penance!”’
Perhaps a message that Christians should be regularly going to confession – the Sacrament of Penance – confessing one’s sins to the priest and receiving absolution for those sins….
There seems little doubt we’re being reminded to do exactly that.
Are we going to?

7
May

FATIMA ANNIVERSARY: what does it mean for us today?

by Arnold Jago in Faith, History, Modern Church, Mother of Jesus

A hundred years ago (May 13, 1917) three uneducated Portuguese children experienced a mystical apparition.
A Lady — whom they took to be Mary the mother of Jesus Christ – visited them six times, on the thirteenth day of each month, May to October 1917.
The visits became well-known. On October 13, a crowd of perhaps 70,000 assembled.
Many reported seeing a spectacular phenomenon in the sky — referred to as the Miracle of the Sun.
The Lady’s message took the form of three “Secrets”.
The First predicted forthcoming events involving Russia.
The Second foretold the soon-coming World War.
The Third remained literally secret until disclosed by Pope John Paul II after his 1981 near-assassination.
It referred to that shooting and to ever-increasing persecution of Christian believers — the message being introduced by an angel crying out, “Penance, Penance, Penance!”
In recent years, “Fatima” has become almost an industry, with commercialisation, conspiracy-theories etc.
But its basic message is simple: What this world needs is Penance — admitting our sins to God and letting him re-make our lives and our world.
First up, Christians must start going to Confession (the sacrament of Penance) regularly.

8
Feb

AUSTRALIA’S CHILD-ABUSE ROYAL COMMISSION: is it worse than useless?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, History, Modern Church, Youth

Sensational statistics from the Royal Commission:
“40 percent of St John of God brothers alleged child-abusers”
Maybe.
“4444 people victims of abuse by Church workers”
Perhaps.
How about:
“7 percent of Catholic priests abusers…compared with 1 to 2 percent of Australia’s general male population”?
No.
After 30 years in medical practice, seeing 150 patients per week, I feel able to comment.
The “1 to 2 percent” figure is wrong – a ludicrously, unbelievably low estimate.
Whoever said that has no idea how frighteningly common abuse is.
Most victims I’ve encountered would never have met a priest.
They’ve met mummy’s latest boyfriend, their uncle, big brother, sport coach and similar.
It’s obviously true that the Church has done a poor job of weeding out and dealing with abusers.
The rest of society has done worse — and still seems to be in denial.
Pretending it’s mainly a Church problem isn’t helping.