‘Forgiving’ Category Archives

6
Dec

CHRISTMAS: why bother?

by Arnold Jago in Contemplation, Faith, Family, Forgiving, Happiness, History, Jesus, Lifestyle, Modern Church, Multiculturalism, Truth, Youth

Why celebrate Christmas?
Because we can’t help liking, honouring and admiring this unique person, Jesus Christ.
He was the ultimate one-off.
Above all, see how he totally refused to compromise.
When his challenging message was leading inevitably to his own painful death, he made his message even more challenging, more confronting.
There was no mistaking it:
“Love your enemies!”
Pray to God, saying:
“Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us!”
Yes, the Christian church is faulty — tragically unworthy of him who founded it….
Yet it’s in the church that we can hear his gospel read and preached.
In the church we can meet together with others who at least have a go at living Christ’s way.
Jesus Christ, born so long ago, can make you and me better.
He offers a motive for our children to grow into people who are better.
That’s why Christmas is important.
Have a good one.

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24
Nov

FORGIVENESS FOR ABORTION: the pope’s position gets a mixture of boos and hoorays.

by Arnold Jago in crime, Death, Family, Forgiving, Modern Church, Women

As from now the Pope says that all priests are able to give absolution (forgiveness) to persons involved in abortion.
Previously only certain priests had that authority.
He makes it clear that abortion was, is, and always will be, a grave sin.
But he’s trying to be a bit merciful in the way that grave sin is dealt with.
Anyway, let’s hope he wasn’t hoping to be thanked by the progressive types, including self-styled feminists.
For example, a lady journalist of the Sydney Morning Herald (22 November 2016) uses the headline “Women don’t need Pope Francis’ forgiveness for having abortions”.
But do they need God’s forgiveness?
That is the point.

12
Apr

MORE ABOUT AMORIS: is a pope allowed to be “judgmental”? is God allowed to be judgmental?

by Arnold Jago in Faith, Forgiving, God, Lifestyle

Filipino boxer and MP, Manny Pacquiao, got in trouble with the media recently for mentioning that homosexuals, in view of the acts they typically perform, could be described as “worse than animals”.
He later apologised for upsetting people.
But he didn’t exactly apologise for the content of what he had said:
“The problem is they cut my interview . . . the interview is about 5-10 minutes, but they cut it short.
“I explained it properly, that who am I to condemn or discriminate against other people? I’m also human, I’m also a sinner, so who am I to condemn other people?
“But what I’m telling is the truth, and what I am condemning is the act, that’s what I am explaining, the act.”
If the Pope is to lead the Church aright, he must judge people’s wrong lifestyles.
He must tell them that God hates what they do.
He must also find ways to reassure them that God loves them more than they can imagine, and that their sins are forgivable.

10
Jul

SO YOU WANT TO BE A PROSPEROUS CHRISTIAN . . . ? perhaps there is no such thing. perhaps “austerity” is part of the deal? I didn’t say that, God said it.

by Arnold Jago in Faith, Forgiving, God, Modern Church, Money

The present Pope keeps saying the Church should be poor.

He calls himself Francis — seeking to exemplify the spirit of St Francis of Assisi, who was born to an affluent family, then chose to live in voluntary poverty.

We, too, must at least be willing to go without anything, insofar as doing so will help others physically or spiritually.

Consider the Lord – Jesus Christ himself – a homeless person, by choice.

 “A teacher of the law came to Jesus and said, “Teacher, I will follow you any place you go.”

Jesus answered, “The foxes have holes to live in. The birds have nests. But the Son of Man has no place to rest.”

(Matthew’s Gospel, chapter 8)

* * *

Not only must we willingly go without physical comforts, we must go without the notion of having “rights” — even the right to demand justice.

The prayer Jesus taught asks God to “. . . forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.”

Having taught that prayer, in his next breath he drove the forgiveness requirement home:

“. . . if  you do not forgive, neither will your Father who is in heaven forgive your transgressions.”

(Mark’s gospel, chapter 11)

 

22
Dec

HAVING A GOOD CHRISTMAS: back to basics.

by Arnold Jago in Common Sense, Family, Forgiving, Happiness, Jesus

Every week doesn’t it get worse — the media full of terrible and frightening events?

But this week, let’s focus on something good.

Think back to the life and death of that Jewish baby born on the first Christmas Day.

In that stable where Jesus Christ first saw light of day there were no high-tech toys. Yet there was joy.

His “swaddling clothes” carried no designer-labels. But there was contentment.

No feast, no pudding. Yet there was satisfaction.

No real security or safety. But, miraculously, there was faith.

The Christmas miracle is that God is generous and God is love.

This week, as we gather as families, please share love.

If there are chips on shoulders, forgive.

Offer God our future.

That way, however seemingly bad the news, God will give us loving hearts to work together for a better world.

 

16
Sep

IAN PAISLEY DIED A CHANGED MAN: can the rest of us change?

by Arnold Jago in Forgiving, History, Modern Church, Politics

Reverend Ian Paisley, Protestant preacher-politician and anti-Catholic rabble-rouser has died.

Back in 1963, when Pope John XXIII died, Rev Paisley said, “This Romish man of sin is now in hell!”

In 2005, when Pope John Paul II died, he said, “We can understand how Roman Catholics feel at the death of the Pope and we would want in no way to interfere with their expression of sorrow . . .”

To a Calvinist-Protestant, seemingly un-convertible, had come a partial change of heart.

Like Saint Paul, on the Damascus road 2000 years earlier, as per the Book of Acts, chapter 9?

Dare we hope for changed mentalities in followers of Islam if the Christian Church commits to living faithful to its peaceful Founder?

Let’s hope so.

Military activities won’t achieve it.

As Pope Francis said the other day at a World War I commemoration:

“War is madness . . . .

“Humanity needs to weep, and this is the time to weep . . . .”