‘Ethics’ Category Archives

22
May

IF YOU WANT TO BE FREE TO BELIEVE AND TO EXPRESS BELIEFS, YOU MAY HAVE TO PAY A PRICE: some recent relevant events.

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Ethics, Justice, Persecution

In March 2017, Coopers Breweries — threatened with boycotts for associating themselves with the Bible Society – capitulated, declaring themselves Same Sex Marriage fans after all.
And a Mr. Mark Allaby, likewise, quit his affiliation with the Australian Christian Lobby — under threat of losing his job with IBM.
Now, in May, the Australian Medical Association issues a statement that Australian law, which defines marriage in traditional fashion, “has significant psychosocial and psychological health consequences for LGBTIQ-identifying Australians….”
Is that the best the reasoning powers of our medical fraternity can come up with on the subject?
By contrast, consider Bernard Gaynor — father of seven, expelled from the Australian Army despite meritorious service in Afghanistan and Iraq with the rank of Major….
His crime? Saying that the army shouldn’t disobey its own regulations by letting uniformed members participate in a public political activity (Sydney’s homosexual Mardi Gras) – and describing the generals responsible as “cowards”.
What is important about Bernard Gaynor is that he has not knuckled under or compromised as the others have.

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11
May

ENSLAVED NEW WORLD: occasional new slogans but inwardly just more of the same?

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Beauty, Ethics, Lifestyle, Media, Politics

Head of state: a deranged, amoral, self-absorbed, survival-obsessed psychopath?
Media: a lying, brain-rotting tool of corporate wealth?
Traditional culture: a hypocritical, enfeebled, decaying carcase?
Youth: promiscuous, social-media-group-think-addicted narcissists?
Name me one nation on earth where the above doesn’t apply.
Fair-go-mouthing Australia? Great-again America?
Hardly.
Do I, perhaps, exaggerate?
Anyway, if any renewal of goodness is to happen anywhere, it will have to start small.
In our own personal decision-making. In our families. In our church(?)
Now and then there are signs of hope.
But don’t wait for somebody else to do something.
Repeat these words regularly:
“Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done, on earth as in heaven….”

1
May

THE MAY 7 FRENCH ELECTION: pretty important issues affecting the whole world

by Arnold Jago in Ethics, Faith, Family, Modern Church, Multiculturalism, Politics

Emmanuel Macron is favourite to become France’s president on May 7.
The election has been described as a choice between Le Pen and “Le Pawn”.
Pawn of what?
Macron’s background is in banking. Big banking. Macron’s employer from 2008 to 2012 was Banque Rothschild.
Predictably, he’s a supporter of the EU, open borders and the socialist status quo.
In 2007, Macron married a woman who, 20-odd years previously, was his (married) school teacher – older than Macron by 25 years.
You’d think the last thing a country like France needs is mass-immigration and trivialisation of traditional family and marriage.
Secure borders and respect for traditional marriage are among the main points of Macron’s rival, Marine Le Pen.
Interestingly, Le Pen’s attitudes to immigration are very similar to those expressed in the Catechism of the Catholic Church (section 2241).

22
Apr

EUTHANASIA: who needs it? who decides?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Death, Ethics, Modern Church

Last week, Victoria’s bishops issued a pastoral letter to the Catholics of Victoria about Euthanasia.
Obviously, they’re against euthanasia.
Why not?
And they remind us that those places where euthanasia has been legalised have subsequently broadened, step by step, the categories of persons eligible to be killed.
For example, in Belgium, euthanasia is now legal for children as well as adults.
In the Netherlands, people aged over 70 who feel “tired of life” are now eligible.
In Belgium, euthanasia may now be legally done on psychological grounds.
The “slippery slope” is not a theoretical thing – it’s a reality, killing off vulnerable persons every day, including today.

7
Apr

RACIAL DISCRIMINATION ACT, SECTION 18C: still in force, so what do we do?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Common Sense, Ethics, God, Politics

Australia’s Racial Discrimination Act, section 18C, is still the law of the land.
It’s still un-lawful to make anybody feel “offended”.
But principled people never intentionally offend others, do they?
And they never contravene laws — or do they?
A couple of finer points to consider:
1. Regarding offending: while not intending to offend, you can’t control the feelings of sensitive persons who claim offence — or prove your innocent intention to somebody determined not to believe you. They’ve got you over a barrel.
2. Regarding obeying the law: consider the famous occasion when Jesus Christ was asked whether his fellow-Jews should pay taxes to the Roman occupiers. He said, “Pay to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and give to God what is God’s.”
In the case of 18C, let’s usually comply with it — but sometimes, when a black-and-white moral issue is at stake, God trumps everybody else.

28
Mar

IS HELPING PEOPLE KILL THEMSELVES OK? killing free speech seems to be OK too.

by Arnold Jago in Death, Ethics, Politics, Suffering

Victoria’s Health Minister, Jill Hennessy, has released a discussion paper on “developing and implementing a legislative framework for voluntary assisted dying”.
We, the public, are allowed to submit feedback (closing date, April 10).
But only certain kinds of feedback.
Her department warns:
“Please note that feedback that expresses an opinion for or against assisted dying will not be considered by the panel.”
So, we’re not permitted to discuss whether it’s right to intentionally make patients dead — only how to intentionally make patients dead.
Aren’t there non-homicidal alternatives — good nursing, fine-tuning of drug dosages, one-to-one spiritual support in facing the lonely truth of the situation?
What a pity not to address them seriously.
Spiritual support comes at a cost.
Money and time costs aren’t the issue — millions of Australian adults can afford, on average, 4 hours a day looking at screens (television, internet etc.)
The issue is whether we care enough.
Are we willing to expend the necessary long-term effort required to provide that spiritual support?