‘Death’ Category Archives

21
Feb

HOW TO BE A HOMICIDAL NEIGHBOUR: sprinting in the wrong direction….

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Death, Health, Politics, Women

Did you know that Australia is committing $9.5 million of taxpayers’ money over three years to support abortion in poorer neighbouring countries…?
Neighbours like Vanuatu, Fiji and Nepal….
Meanwhile USA is aborting its abortion-funding programs.
President Trump has de-funded international abortion-provider “Planned Parenthood” – plus all fundings for foreign abortion agencies.
Australia’s abortion-funding comes under our so-called SPRINT program (as in “Sex Health Reproductive Program in Crisis and Post Crisis Settings”).
Foreign Minister Julie Bishop is all for it.
But is helping to abort their children a “neighbourly” thing to do for one’s neighbors?

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11
Jan

EUTHANASIA AND THE “CONSCIENCE VOTE”: by the way, what does “conscience” mean?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Death, Ethics, Health, Justice, Suffering, Truth

Victorian state MPs may soon participate in a “conscience vote” about legalising euthanasia by doctor-assisted suicide.
What do these people think “conscience” means?
For most it seems to mean “what I feel comfortable with”.
Being comfortable is a feeling — not the same as using one’s intelligence or willing good to another person.
If you’re uncomfortable witnessing somebody in a weakened or undignified state or having to bear incompletely-controlled pain, there’s a simple, only-too-obvious solution — kill that person or help him/her suicide.
Less convenient is the alternative — the attention to detail of good nursing and medication-dosage plus one-to-one spiritual support in facing the lonely truth of the situation.
Traditionally “conscience” means putting into practice what is one’s best understanding of Moral Truth — seeking the best possible fulfilment of the person of the sufferer, given the present situation.
Why? Because we love that person.
By contrast, killing is a cop-out.

9
Jan

DR RODNEY SYME AND THE VICTORIAN GOVERNMENT: doing the wrong thing by terminal patients.

by Arnold Jago in crime, Death, Ethics, Health, Justice, Politics, Suffering

In early 2016, a Victorian man with advanced tongue cancer was offered Nembutal (illegal lethal tablets) by euthanasia-promoting doctor, Dr Rodney Syme.
The patient’s GP complained and the Medical Board of Victoria put a ban on Dr Syme from practising end-of-life patient care – describing him as a “serious risk”.
Dr Syme appealed to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) which has reversed the ban.
Why?
Assisting a patient to commit suicide is against the law in Victoria and carries a 5-year prison sentence.
That is an excellent law, designed to protect vulnerable people from falling into the hands of the euthanasia types — while, hopefully, accessing care from proper palliative care doctors.
The Victorian government plans to reverse that law — a bad move which would endanger the frail, the despairing, the weak and the elderly.

6
Jan

VICTORIAN GOVERNMENT PUSHES “MERCY-KILLING”: can they be stopped? do enough people care?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Death, Ethics, Politics

The Victorian government — determined to introduce legalised euthanasia — assure us there will be strict “safeguards”.
Do they really believe those safeguards will be adhered to long-term?
Anyway, safeguards aren’t the point.
The problem with mercy-killing is that it is killing.
It isn’t “letting the patient die”. Or “letting the patient refuse treatment”. Those things are legal already.
Any act or omission which intentionally causes death in order to eliminate suffering constitutes a murder.
On the other hand, discontinuing medical procedures that are burdensome or disproportionate to the expected outcome can be legitimate.
Using painkillers to alleviate sufferings, even at the risk of shortening their days, can be acceptable if death is not the intention, but is only foreseen and tolerated.

31
Dec

MURDER OF CHILDREN: holy innocents, then and now.

by Arnold Jago in Death, History, Jesus, Multiculturalism, Persecution, Recent Developments

For Christians, December 28 is/was the Feast of the Holy Innocents”.
The “innocents” being babies murdered by King Herod, who feared a possible new-born alternative king.
“When Herod realised that he had been outwitted by the Magi (wise men) he gave orders to kill all boys in the Bethlehem region aged two years and under….” (Matthew’s gospel, chapter 2)
We know who killed those Bethlehem victims.
Who is murdering the hundreds of innocents being killed right now — daily, week in, week out?
Don’t we and our politicians and media bend over backwards to avoid suggesting that it’s mostly done by Muslims?
Is Islam, in fact, an ideology of violence dressed up as a religion?
We’d like that not to be true. Don’t we all long for a day when all Muslims renounce violence?
But we see little reason to expect it.
Denial and lies certainly aren’t helping.

23
Dec

ISLAM AND THE FUTURE: thoughts about the options to choose between.

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Death, God, History, Modern Church, Politics

Check our media — is the only religion anybody takes seriously today Islam?
Involving (for some) taking seriously Koran chapter 2 which says about unbelievers:
“Kill them wherever you find them…fight them until there is no more disbelief….”
How best to react?
Voting for “conservative” parties?
One Nation? But don’t they specialise in unpredictable candidates?
A new party sponsored by Mr Bernardi and Mrs Rinehart? But aren’t they too economically dry and market-loving?
Like it or not, governments have to provide some kind of safety-net for those whose children would starve if nobody intervenes….
No. Political parties, by themselves, can’t do the trick.
What could be handy is a Church with credibility — to get people thinking straight.
Straight — as in putting God first — and the common good for all God’s children equal first – and our beloved selfishness, greed, pride, lust etc. last and nowhere….
Politicians of whatever party might then notice that, to stay elected, they’ll need to start doing the right thing.