‘Death’ Category Archives

25
Apr

ANZAC: time to reflect??????

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Death, Politics, Prayer, Suffering

ANZAC gives us time to reflect on the futile hideousness of war.
Also on how — human nature being basically good — peace will overcome evil if we try hard to copy the courage of the ANZACS.
Unfortunately, this second reflection isn’t true.
Today’s world has reached a point where wishful thinking can no longer keep us dumbed-down like before.
Meanness, lying, bullying, hatred – these dominate both our personal lives and international geo-politics.
What to do?
There are many options, e.g. pre-emptively blow North Korea apart, teach children gender-inclusiveness, adopt various postures towards Islam, impose sanctions on certain nation-states…?
None of these measures are sufficiently practical.
The most practical thing you and I can do is to pray.
How about an extra hour of praying per day?
No time?
On the contrary, if you don’t do it, I think you won’t have any time at all.
None of us will.
Time, for humans, may well be no more.

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22
Apr

EUTHANASIA: who needs it? who decides?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Death, Ethics, Modern Church

Last week, Victoria’s bishops issued a pastoral letter to the Catholics of Victoria about Euthanasia.
Obviously, they’re against euthanasia.
Why not?
And they remind us that those places where euthanasia has been legalised have subsequently broadened, step by step, the categories of persons eligible to be killed.
For example, in Belgium, euthanasia is now legal for children as well as adults.
In the Netherlands, people aged over 70 who feel “tired of life” are now eligible.
In Belgium, euthanasia may now be legally done on psychological grounds.
The “slippery slope” is not a theoretical thing – it’s a reality, killing off vulnerable persons every day, including today.

28
Mar

IS HELPING PEOPLE KILL THEMSELVES OK? killing free speech seems to be OK too.

by Arnold Jago in Death, Ethics, Politics, Suffering

Victoria’s Health Minister, Jill Hennessy, has released a discussion paper on “developing and implementing a legislative framework for voluntary assisted dying”.
We, the public, are allowed to submit feedback (closing date, April 10).
But only certain kinds of feedback.
Her department warns:
“Please note that feedback that expresses an opinion for or against assisted dying will not be considered by the panel.”
So, we’re not permitted to discuss whether it’s right to intentionally make patients dead — only how to intentionally make patients dead.
Aren’t there non-homicidal alternatives — good nursing, fine-tuning of drug dosages, one-to-one spiritual support in facing the lonely truth of the situation?
What a pity not to address them seriously.
Spiritual support comes at a cost.
Money and time costs aren’t the issue — millions of Australian adults can afford, on average, 4 hours a day looking at screens (television, internet etc.)
The issue is whether we care enough.
Are we willing to expend the necessary long-term effort required to provide that spiritual support?

21
Feb

HOW TO BE A HOMICIDAL NEIGHBOUR: sprinting in the wrong direction….

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Death, Health, Politics, Women

Did you know that Australia is committing $9.5 million of taxpayers’ money over three years to support abortion in poorer neighbouring countries…?
Neighbours like Vanuatu, Fiji and Nepal….
Meanwhile USA is aborting its abortion-funding programs.
President Trump has de-funded international abortion-provider “Planned Parenthood” – plus all fundings for foreign abortion agencies.
Australia’s abortion-funding comes under our so-called SPRINT program (as in “Sex Health Reproductive Program in Crisis and Post Crisis Settings”).
Foreign Minister Julie Bishop is all for it.
But is helping to abort their children a “neighbourly” thing to do for one’s neighbors?

11
Jan

EUTHANASIA AND THE “CONSCIENCE VOTE”: by the way, what does “conscience” mean?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Death, Ethics, Health, Justice, Suffering, Truth

Victorian state MPs may soon participate in a “conscience vote” about legalising euthanasia by doctor-assisted suicide.
What do these people think “conscience” means?
For most it seems to mean “what I feel comfortable with”.
Being comfortable is a feeling — not the same as using one’s intelligence or willing good to another person.
If you’re uncomfortable witnessing somebody in a weakened or undignified state or having to bear incompletely-controlled pain, there’s a simple, only-too-obvious solution — kill that person or help him/her suicide.
Less convenient is the alternative — the attention to detail of good nursing and medication-dosage plus one-to-one spiritual support in facing the lonely truth of the situation.
Traditionally “conscience” means putting into practice what is one’s best understanding of Moral Truth — seeking the best possible fulfilment of the person of the sufferer, given the present situation.
Why? Because we love that person.
By contrast, killing is a cop-out.

9
Jan

DR RODNEY SYME AND THE VICTORIAN GOVERNMENT: doing the wrong thing by terminal patients.

by Arnold Jago in crime, Death, Ethics, Health, Justice, Politics, Suffering

In early 2016, a Victorian man with advanced tongue cancer was offered Nembutal (illegal lethal tablets) by euthanasia-promoting doctor, Dr Rodney Syme.
The patient’s GP complained and the Medical Board of Victoria put a ban on Dr Syme from practising end-of-life patient care – describing him as a “serious risk”.
Dr Syme appealed to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) which has reversed the ban.
Why?
Assisting a patient to commit suicide is against the law in Victoria and carries a 5-year prison sentence.
That is an excellent law, designed to protect vulnerable people from falling into the hands of the euthanasia types — while, hopefully, accessing care from proper palliative care doctors.
The Victorian government plans to reverse that law — a bad move which would endanger the frail, the despairing, the weak and the elderly.