‘crime’ Category Archives


HARM MINIMISATION, LIVE-IN REHABILITATION ETC. living with the drug/anti-drug mega-industry.

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Beauty, crime, Health, Lifestyle, Politics

One of Australia’s biggest industries is, unfortunately, the buying and selling of illegal drugs.
Another growth-industry is the harm-minimisation industry – which includes things like clean needle handouts, safe-injection rooms, methadone maintenance programs – and even live-in rehab centres.
These two industries need each other.
They flourish side by side.
When business is brisk, there will always be somebody willing to come up with a business model for live-in rehab — taxpayer-funded and profit-generating.
They’ll tell how their kind of rehab saves lives, prevents disease etc.
If you feel a bit skeptical about that, you may feel even more so after listening to the conclusions of British psychiatrist/drug researcher, Theodore Dalrymple:

He has written a book about it entitled “Romancing Opiates”.

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DANIEL ANDREWS IS RIGHT ABOUT “PILL-TESTING”: the need to stay rational….

by Arnold Jago in Australia, Common Sense, crime, Ethics, Lifestyle

Last week several people at a Melbourne Festival Hall dance required treatment for breathing difficulties after taking a drug.
Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews is again under pressure to legalise pill-testing at such functions.
No, says the premier, he won’t, because “there is no safe level at which these drugs can be taken….”
Greens Party leader, Richard Di Natale, says Mr Andrews “has his head in the sand” — because young people will always experiment with drugs….
Being opposed by the Greens may be a good sign — many of their policies betray contempt for the rule of law and for human beings as potentially rational creatures.
It won’t be easy for Premier Andrews to stick to principle on this one.
Let’s hope he does.
We need to turn the tide away from irresponsible weak-minded “pragmatic” attitudes.


MARRIAGE LAW AND CUSTOMS: will we ever get them right? why not?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Ethics, Family, Lifestyle

While Australia has been softening its laws about sexual behaviour — white-anting traditional marriage — something different is going on not far away.
On December 12, Indonesia’s Constitutional Court went within one vote (5 votes to 4) of criminalising all sex outside of heterosexual marriage.
In some Indonesian localities, police already raid parties and clubs where such practices occur. There are reports of offenders being publicly flogged.
To many of us Australians, such a response to deviant behavior might seem unacceptably harsh.
Of course, to the nationals of many countries, Australia’s “liberal” trends must seem unacceptably slack and amoral.
Will the human race ever unite in an understanding of natural moral law acceptable to all — able to bring all together as truly loving brothers and sisters?



by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, crime, Family, Modern Church, Recent Developments, Youth

Australia’s Royal Commission into Institutional Child Sex Abuse is over.
Commissioner Justice Peter McClellan has made his speech about how “the nation thanks the survivors”.
The Royal Commission received allegations from over 4000 people regarding abuse by Catholic Church workers.
Which is shameful.
Does the Commission, however, distort the context?
Their eagerness to discredit the Catholic Church seems almost to outweigh any interest in reducing overall child abuse in Australia.
Were thecommissioners unaware of just how common abuse is in the general community?
GP doctors encounter its effects, day in, day out, week in, week out….
It’s everywhere.
Most victims, of course, have never even met a priest.
Who they have met is their mother’s latest boyfriend, their uncle, their big brother, their sport coach etc.
Yes, the Church has done badly.
The rest of society, has done – and is doing – worse.
Pretending it’s mainly a Church problem is dishonest and helps nobody.


“ASSISTED DYING” TO BE LEGAL IN VICTORIA? thinking about the un-thinkable.

by Arnold Jago in Abortion, Australia, Beauty, Celebrities, crime, Death, Ethics, Prayer

The Victorian government plans legalising “assisted dying” for the terminally ill who request it.
They call the new laws “conservative” because they include 68 “safeguards” to prevent abuses.
Such arguments have emotional appeal but are not based on reason.
The traditional Christian teaching should be our guide:
“An act or omission which, of itself or by intention, causes death in order to eliminate suffering constitutes a murder gravely contrary to the dignity of the human person and to the respect due to the living God, his Creator….
“Discontinuing medical procedures that are burdensome, dangerous, extraordinary, or disproportionate to the expected outcome can be legitimate; it is the refusal of “over-zealous” treatment. Here one does not will to cause death; one’s inability to impede it is merely accepted….
“The use of painkillers to alleviate the sufferings of the dying, even at the risk of shortening their days, can be morally in conformity with human dignity if death is not willed as either an end or a means, but only foreseen and tolerated as inevitable….”
(Catholic Catechism, paragraphs 2277-2279)
Caring for the dying and disabled can be expensive in terms of money, time, love and compassion.
Do we care enough to make the effort – refusing to resort to intentional killing?


MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTION ROOMS: a spectre that still stalks.

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Ethics, Health

The mother of a man dead in the street from drug-overdose has condemned the Victorian government for not providing “medically-supervised injecting rooms”.
While trying to sympathise with the lady’s grief, let’s keep clearly in mind why she is wrong.
For injecting rooms to function, the police must turn a blind eye to illegal-drug dealing.
Which means abandoning the rule of law — a big decision and an irresponsible one.
If we don’t arrest and punish drug-dealers, they’ll continue enriching themselves at the expense of others’ self-destruction.
We must aim at nothing less than getting users completely clean and staying that way — otherwise we let them down.