‘crime’ Category Archives

18
Apr

ANTI-CHRISTIAN PERSECUTION: is it genocide? what’s wrong with the Australian government? are they a bit anti-Christian too?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Persecution, Politics

Two Sundays ago, churches in two Egyptian cities were bombed, killing over 40 Christians.
Day in, day out, an average of over 250 Christians worldwide are killed by terrorists.
In February 2016, the European Parliament recognised such killings as “genocide”.
In June 2016, the UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria recognised such killings as “genocide”.
In March 2017, the United States House of Representatives voted 383-0 to recognise such killings as “genocide”.
The Australian government?
So far, they’ve made no such comment, despite requests to do so.
Last week, Australia’s Michael Sukkar MP told Sky News “there needs to be a political awakening and movement for people who want to practise their faith in peace.”
He called on Parliament to recognise such atrocities against Christians as “genocide” — to maintain pressure on the international community.
There’s a petition supporting this call that you and I can sign at:
www.citizengo.org/en-au/pr/49894-easter-will-australian-government-call-christian-persecution-middle-east-genocide?tc=ty&tcid=34826586

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14
Feb

SEXUAL ABUSE OF SCHOOL STUDENTS: what about in government schools?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Education, Justice, Youth

Have there been no public hearings into sexual abuse at Government schools — like those into Catholic schools?
Are there going to be any?
If not, why not?
Have teachers’ unions managed to organise cover-ups?
And why do our media seemingly play down government school abuses?
Is it because complaints against government schools won’t help to bankrupt the Catholic Church?
And because compensation pay-outs against government education departments would raise our taxes — including those of news reporters?
These are possible reasons for self-censorship.
Would it not be a just move for the Royal Commission to investigate them?
(thoughts mainly pinched from: https://www.mercatornet.com/above/view/australias-royal-commission-should-investigate-government-schools/19345)

8
Feb

AUSTRALIA’S CHILD-ABUSE ROYAL COMMISSION: is it worse than useless?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, History, Modern Church, Youth

Sensational statistics from the Royal Commission:
“40 percent of St John of God brothers alleged child-abusers”
Maybe.
“4444 people victims of abuse by Church workers”
Perhaps.
How about:
“7 percent of Catholic priests abusers…compared with 1 to 2 percent of Australia’s general male population”?
No.
After 30 years in medical practice, seeing 150 patients per week, I feel able to comment.
The “1 to 2 percent” figure is wrong – a ludicrously, unbelievably low estimate.
Whoever said that has no idea how frighteningly common abuse is.
Most victims I’ve encountered would never have met a priest.
They’ve met mummy’s latest boyfriend, their uncle, big brother, sport coach and similar.
It’s obviously true that the Church has done a poor job of weeding out and dealing with abusers.
The rest of society has done worse — and still seems to be in denial.
Pretending it’s mainly a Church problem isn’t helping.

9
Jan

DR RODNEY SYME AND THE VICTORIAN GOVERNMENT: doing the wrong thing by terminal patients.

by Arnold Jago in crime, Death, Ethics, Health, Justice, Politics, Suffering

In early 2016, a Victorian man with advanced tongue cancer was offered Nembutal (illegal lethal tablets) by euthanasia-promoting doctor, Dr Rodney Syme.
The patient’s GP complained and the Medical Board of Victoria put a ban on Dr Syme from practising end-of-life patient care – describing him as a “serious risk”.
Dr Syme appealed to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) which has reversed the ban.
Why?
Assisting a patient to commit suicide is against the law in Victoria and carries a 5-year prison sentence.
That is an excellent law, designed to protect vulnerable people from falling into the hands of the euthanasia types — while, hopefully, accessing care from proper palliative care doctors.
The Victorian government plans to reverse that law — a bad move which would endanger the frail, the despairing, the weak and the elderly.

6
Jan

VICTORIAN GOVERNMENT PUSHES “MERCY-KILLING”: can they be stopped? do enough people care?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Death, Ethics, Politics

The Victorian government — determined to introduce legalised euthanasia — assure us there will be strict “safeguards”.
Do they really believe those safeguards will be adhered to long-term?
Anyway, safeguards aren’t the point.
The problem with mercy-killing is that it is killing.
It isn’t “letting the patient die”. Or “letting the patient refuse treatment”. Those things are legal already.
Any act or omission which intentionally causes death in order to eliminate suffering constitutes a murder.
On the other hand, discontinuing medical procedures that are burdensome or disproportionate to the expected outcome can be legitimate.
Using painkillers to alleviate sufferings, even at the risk of shortening their days, can be acceptable if death is not the intention, but is only foreseen and tolerated.

5
Jan

HOW BEST TO DEAL WITH THE METHAMPHETAMINE/”ICE” PROBLEM? do “experts” sometimes not know what they are talking about?

by Arnold Jago in Australia, crime, Justice, Lifestyle, Politics, Youth

The Federal Government’s Inquiry into Crystal Methamphetamine has received multiple submissions from multiple groups of “experts”.
A lot of these submissions make the same claims in more or less the same words. But do they make any sense?
The common theory seems to be that to discourage drugs — including methamphetamine (“ice”) — should be discouraged.
Why? Because (they say) using the law and the media and classrooms to deter methamphetamine use will do harm by causing “stigmatisation” and “discrimination”.
These expert groups include the Victorian Alcohol and Drug Association, the Western Australian Network of Alcohol and Other Drug Agencies, the National Drug Research Institute and the National Association of People Living with HIV Australia.
Not everyone would agree that stigmatisation does more harm that using drugs.
We don’t legalise rape, murder, shoplifting etc. because banning them could make thieves, rapists and thieves feel stigmatised.
Should we?
I don’t think so.